Horace Rumpole and the Poems Quoted

Horace Rumpole and the Poems (and Classics) Quoted

Rumpole of the Old Bailey, about Rumpole the idiosyncratic barrister practicing in London, by John Mortimer is one of my favorite TV series of all times. Among the many reasons to like this TV-series, poetry for me is a top attraction. Rumpole recites passages from classic poems and plays almost in every episode. What is so endearing about his quoting poetry and the classics is his choice of poems and passages there from is always a perfect fit for the plot of the episode. Through watching this TV series, one gets the delightful education of some beautiful gems of English literature without the burden of having to sit through a test at the end. Now that is edutainment.

Here is a partial list of the poems and other works cited. It will be updated as and when I discover more gems while I continue to watch and re-watch Rumpole. Help and comments from all fellow Rumpole fans are most welcome. Sorry for the lack of the table format which was lost while pasting over from MS-WORD.

Updated 29 August 2012
SN Episode Poet Poem Catch Lines
1.0 Confession Of Guilt William Wordsworth There Was A Boy At evening, when the earliest stars began
To move along the edges of the hills
1.1 The Younger Generation William Wordsworth Intimations Of Immortality From Recollections Of Early Childhood But trailing clouds of glory do we come
1.2 Alternative Society William Wordsworth It Is Not To Be Thought Of We must be free or die, who speak the tongue
That Shakspeare spake; the faith and morals hold
Which Milton held
1.2 Alternative Society William Wordsworth It Is A Beauteous Evening, Calm And Free IT is a beauteous evening, calm and free,
The holy time is quiet as a Nun
Breathless with adoration; the broad sun
Is sinking down in its tranquillity;
The gentleness of heaven broods o’er the Sea:.
1.3 The Honourable Member William Shakespeare A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act 3, Scene 1 And when she weeps, weeps every little flower, Lamenting some enforced chastity
1.4 The Married Lady William Shakespeare King Richard II, Act 5, scene 5 I wasted time, and now doth time waste me
1.5 The Married Lady Percy Bysshe Shelley Epipsychidion With one chained friend, perhaps a jealous foe, The dreariest and the longest journey go
1.5 The Married Lady Scott, Sir Walter Marmion Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade
By the light quivering aspen made
1.6 Heavy Brigade Thomas Hood November No warmth, no cheerfulness
1.6 Heavy Brigade William Wordsworth My heart leaps up when I behold a rainbow in the sky
1.6 Heavy Brigade John Keats Ode to Autumn Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
2.1 Man of God Robert Browning Song, From Pippa Passes Morning’s at seven;
The hill-side’s dew-pearled
2.1 Man of God William Wordsworth The Solitary Reaper Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
For old, unhappy, far-off things
And battles long ago:
2.2 The Case of Identity William Blake The Tiger Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
2.2 The Case of Identity William Shakespeare Henry V Act 4 Scene 3 That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
Let him depart; his passport shall be made
And crowns for convoy put into his purse:
We would not die in that man’s company
2.3 The Show Folks William Shakespeare Hamlet Act 1 Scene 1 ’Tis bitter cold, and I am sick at heart
2.3 The Show Folks William Shakespeare Henry V Chorus 11 Can this cockpit hold
The vasty fields of France? or may we cram
Within this wooden O the very casques
That did affright the air at Agincourt?
2.4 The Fascist Beast Oliver Goldsmith The Village Schoolmaster And still they gaz’d and still the wonder grew,
That one small head could carry all he knew.
2.5 The course of true love William Shakespeare A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act 1 Scene 1 The course of true love never did run smooth
2.6 Age Of Retirement Alfred, Lord Tennyson Ulysses It little profits that an idle king..
How dull it is to pause, to make an end,
To rust unburnish’d, not to shine in use!
2.6 Age Of Retirement Alfred, Lord Tennyson Ulysses .. Matched with an agèd wife, I mete and dole
Unequal laws unto a savage race,
That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
..
‘Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
..
Though much is taken, much abides; and though
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
[2.7] Rumpole’s Return Ben Johnson A Farewell to the World Nor for my peace will I go far,
As wanderers do, that still do roam;
But make my strengths, such as they are,
Here in my bosom, and at home.
[2.7] Rumpole’s Return Shakespeare Sonnet 129 The expense of spirit in a waste of shame
Is lust in action: and till action, lust
Is perjured, murderous, bloody, full of blame,
Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust;
Enjoyed no sooner but despised straight;
Past reason hunted; and no sooner had,
Past reason hated, as a swallowed bait,
On purpose laid to make the taker mad.
[2.7] Rumpole’s Return Wordsworth British Freedom the Flood
Of British freedom, which, to the open sea
Of the world’s praise, from dark antiquity
Hath flowed, ‘with pomp of waters, unwithstood,’
3.1 The Genuine Article John Keats Ode On Grecian Urn ‘Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all
Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know
3.2 The Golden Thread James Elroy Flecker The Golden Road (Journey) to Samarkand Away, for we are ready to a man!
Our camels sniff the evening and are glad.
Lead on, O Master of the Caravan:
Lead on the Merchant-Princes of Bagdad.
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further: it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or that glimmering sea…
3.3 The Old Boy Net Robert Louis Stevenson Requiem
UNDER the wide and starry sky
Dig the grave and let me lie: Glad did I live and gladly die,
And I laid me down with a will.

This be the verse you ‘grave for me:
Here he lies where he long’d to be;
Home is the sailor, home from the sea,
And the hunter home from the hill.
3.4 The Female of the Species Shakespeare Julius Caesar Act III, Brutus: There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat;
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.
3.5 The Sporting Life William Blake Auguries Of Innocence A robin redbreast [calling pheasant] in a cage
Puts all heaven in a rage
3.6 The Last Resort Shakespeare Sonnet 66 Tired with all these, for restful death, I cry.
4.1 The Old Old Story Wordsworth It Is Not To Be Thought Of In our halls is hung
Armoury of the invincible Knights of old:
We must be free or die, who speak the tongue
That Shakspeare spake; the faith and morals hold
Which Milton held.–In everything we are sprung
Of Earth’s first blood, have titles manifold.
4.2 The Blind Tasting John Keats Ode To A Nightingale With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, And purple-stained mouth; That I might drink, and leave the world unseen, And with thee fade away into the forest dim
4.3 The Official Secret William Congreve The Double Dealer (1694) Retired to their tea and scandal, according to their ancient custom.
4.4 The Judge’s Elbow Rudyard Kipling The Song of the Little Hunter Through the Jungle very softly flits a shadow and a sigh
4.5 The Bright Serapham Samuel Taylor Coleridge Rime Of The Ancient Mariner This seraph-band, each waved his hand : It was a heavenly sight !
4.6 Last Case Alfred, Lord Tennyson The Lotus Eater “COURAGE!” he said, and pointed toward the land, “This mounting wave will roll us shoreward soon.”
In the afternoon they came unto a land
In which it seemed always afternoon.
4.6 Last Case Arthur Hugh Clough How Pleasant It Is To Have Money As I sat at the cafe, I said to myself
4.6 Last Case James Graham My Dear And Only Love He either fears his fate too much, Or his deserts are small, That puts it not unto the touch To win or lose it all
5.1 The Bubbling Reputation John Keats La Belle Dame.. What can ail thee..
5.1 The Bubbling Reputation Shakespeare Othello, Act III Scene 3 Who steals my purse steals trash; ’t is something, nothing;
’T was mine, ’t is his, and has been slave to thousands;
But he that filches from me my good name
Robs me of that which not enriches him
And makes me poor indeed.
5.1 The Bubbling Reputation Wordsworth And homeless near a thousand homes I stood,
And near a thousand tables pined and wanted food
5.2 The Barrow Boy William Shakespeare Macbeth, Act 2 scene 2 Methought I heard a voice cry, ‘Sleep no more! Macbeth doth murder sleep’
5.3 The Age Of Miracles William Shakespeare Richard III, Act 3, Scene 7 When holy and devout religious men
Are at their beads, ’tis hard to draw them thence, So sweet is zealous contemplation
5.4 The Tap End O. Goldsmith When Lovely Woman Stoops To Folly WHEN lovely woman stoops to folly,
And finds too late that men betray,
5.5 Portia Percy Bysshe Shelley To A Skylark We look before and after, And pine for what is not
5.6 The Quality Of Life Alfred, Lord Tennyson The Charge Of The Light Brigade Cannon to right of them cannon to left of them
6.1 A La Carte William Wordsworth The River Duddon SOLE listener, Duddon! to the breeze that played
With thy clear voice, I caught the fitful sound
Wafted o’er sullen moss and craggy mound
6.1 A La Carte William Wordsworth Daffodils For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood
6.2 Summer of Discontent Robert Browning Pippa’s Song THE year ‘s at the spring,
And day ‘s at the morn;
Morning ‘s at seven;
The hill-side ‘s dew-pearl’d;
The lark ‘s on the wing;
The snail ‘s on the thorn;
God ‘s in His heaven –
All ‘s right with the world!
6.2 Summer of Discontent Algernon Charles Swinburne The Garden of Proserpine
From too much love of living,
From hope and fear set free,
We thank with brief thanksgiving
Whatever gods may be
That no life lives for ever;
That dead men rise up never;
That even the weariest river
Winds somewhere safe to sea.
6.3 The Right to Silence William Wordsworth Ode
Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood But yet I know, where’er I go,
that there hath passed away a glory from the earth
6.4 Rumpole at Sea Samuel Taylor Cooleridge The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Like one, that on a lonesome road
Doth walk in fear and dread,
And having once turned round walks on,
And turns no more his head;
Because he knows, a frightful fiend
Doth close behind him tread.

But soon there breathed a wind on me,
Nor sound nor motion made:
Its path was not upon the sea,
In ripple or in shade.

It raised my hair, it fanned my cheek
Like a meadow-gale of spring–
It mingled strangely with my fears,
Yet it felt like a welcoming.

Swiftly, swiftly flew the ship,
Yet she sailed softly too:
Sweetly, sweetly blew the breeze–
On me alone it blew.
6.4 Rumpole at Sea Lewis Carroll The Hunting of the Snark In the midst of the word he was trying to say,
In the midst of his laughter and glee,
He had softly and suddenly vanished away
6.5 Rumpole and the Quacks Shakespeare Othello Act 3, Scene 3 Not poppy, nor mandragora,
Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world,
Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep
Which thou owedst yesterday.
6.6 Rumpole for the Prosecution Shakespeare Othello Act 2, Scene 2 Use every man after his desert, and who should ’scape whipping? [translated: If every man gets what he deserves, would anyone ever escape a whipping?]
7.1 The Children Of The Devil John Milton Paradise Lost Book II High on a throne of royal state, which far Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind, Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand Show’rs on her kings barbaric pearl and gold, Satan exalted sat
7.2 Miscarriage of Justice – – -
7.3 The Eternal Triangle Shakespeare Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1 Nymph in thy orisons be all my sins remembered
7.3 The Eternal Triangle John Keats La Belle Dame Sans Merci I met a lady in the meads Full beautiful, a faery’s child; Her hair was long, her foot was light, And her eyes were wild
7.4 The Reform of Joby Johnson Shakespeare Tempest Act 3 Scene 2 Be not afeard. The isle is full of noises,
Sounds, and sweet airs that give delight and hurt not.
Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
Will hum about mine ears, and sometime voices
That, if I then had waked after long sleep,
Will make me sleep again. And then, in dreaming,
The clouds methought would open and show riches
Ready to drop upon me, that when I waked
I cried to dream again.
7.5 The Family Pride Alfred, Lord Tennyson Blow Bugle Blow The splendour falls on castle walls And snowy summits old in story
7.5 The Family Pride Robert Southey Inchcape Rock No stir in the air, no stir in the sea
7.6 On Trial Lord Byron We’ll Go No More A-roving For the sword outwears its sheath, And the soul wears out the breast, And the heart must pause to breathe, And love itself have rest

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28 Responses to “Horace Rumpole and the Poems Quoted”

  1. Tom Buchanan Says:

    Nice to find a kindred spirit. I am rewatching Rumpole at the moment and looking up the poetry references too.

    Great sport.

  2. Tom Buchanan Says:

    3.2 We are the Pilgrims, Master. We shall always go a little further

    from Golden Journey to Samarkand, by James Elroy Flecker

    Rumpole’s opening lines while washing dishes with Hilda.

  3. Pooja Shah Says:

    thank you! have been looking for a list like this. its entirely thanks to Rumpole that I’ve begun to enjoy English poetry. Long may he live! :)

  4. Pooja Shah Says:

    just remembered one though can’t place which episode – From Othello “Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls. Who steals my purse steals trash; ’tis something, nothing; …”

  5. ratnumber6 Says:

    Thanks for viewing. The quote from Othello was alluded to in Rumpole episode 5.1 in The Bubbly Reputation.

  6. rob Says:

    wasn’t there an episode with an excerpt from a selection by a.e. housman?

  7. tersh Says:

    Trying to hunt down this beauty (anyone?)
    “… to mete and dole unequal laws unto a savage race that (something) and (something) and know not me …”
    Shakespeare? King Lear?

    • Pooja Shah Says:

      To Tersh – was about to reply only to realise i was too late :)

      i know this has got nothing to do with the poetry quoted in rumpole but why isn’t the uk coming up with such wonderful eccentrics like dear old horace anymore? friends in uk now recommend miranda, not going out, twenty twelve which are fine but where are the appleby’s, audrey fforbes-hamiltons and rumpoles?

  8. tersh Says:

    Found it-
    Matched with an aged wife, I mete and dole
    Unequal laws unto a savage race,
    That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
    – Alfred Lord Tennyson

    • ratnumber6 Says:

      Thank you tersh. Yes, this is from the end of episode 2.6 Age of Retirement when he gave a speech to the surprise of everyone present that he was not going to quit yet.

  9. Dewey Says:

    Well done, sir. I raise a glass of 21 year old Glenlivet to your praise!

  10. Pooja Shah Says:

    In 7.3 – The Eternal Triangle he also quotes a line from Hamlet’s soliloquy “Nymph in thy orisons be all my sins remembered”.

    • ratnumber6 Says:

      Thank you Pooja. The quote, placed right in the beginning, gives a hint to what is to come in the episode; doesn’t it?

  11. Pooja Shah Says:

    I suppose so but until you pointed it out, it didn’t dawn on me :)

  12. Lee Says:

    Did Rumpole once quote something along the lines of:
    No sun, no warmth, …………………………..November.

    • ratnumber6 Says:

      Hi Lee, yes Rumpole aptly quoted from the poem November by Thomas Hood in Episode 1.6 Heavy Brigade. It is a smart word play with the word No-vember. The whole poem is here:
      No sun – no moon!
      No morn – no noon –
      No dawn – no dusk – no proper time of day.
      No warmth, no cheerfulness, no healthful ease,
      No comfortable feel in any member –
      No shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees,
      No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no birds! –
      November!

  13. Richard Says:

    great blog, someone should publish a Rumpole anthology. Sure that somewhere Rumpole quotes Portia (of these chambers!?) in Merchany of Venice; PORTIA
    The quality of mercy is not strained.
    It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
    Upon the place beneath. It is twice blessed:
    It blesseth him that gives and him that takes

    • ratnumber6 Says:

      Thanks Richard for the input. You are right, it does look like a quote from one of the episodes after Phyllida was appointed as “recorder” in 5.5. I have yet to find out which episode it is.

  14. Pooja Shah Says:

    In The Honourable Member Rumpole also quotes Shakespeare’s Sonnet 57 “Being your slave what should I do but tend…” – directed at She Who Must be Obeyed of course :). Well atleast he does so in the book. Don’t know about the television adaptation.

  15. Andrew Says:

    Rumpole is reshowing at the moment on the new Freeview channel Drama. Am loving it again for the n’th time.
    “A Thing of beauty is a joy for ever”

  16. http://overmanfoundation.wordpress.com/2012/04/24/a-rare-interview-of-sri-aurobindo/ Says:

    Very good post. I absolutely love this website. Keep writing!

  17. David "Tex" Allen Says:

    For people who desire to enjoy the poetry (and also non-poetry) quotes RUMPOLE makes, but who may need media materials to support that, I offer the following:

    The entire set of all 44 episodes of RUMPOLE OF THE BAILEY is available and called a “Megaset.” http://WWW.Amazon.Com sells used “Megasets” of the RUMPOLE programs for $25.99 (USD) and in addition charges $ 3.99 for shippin (USD).

    RUMPOLE (Leo McKern) mentions the Oxford poetry reference books and http://WWW.Amazon.Com also sells the Oxford reference book likely to have most of the poetry quotes RUMPOLE makes during the series.

    This book is sold used for $ .01 (one cent!) (USD) and is titled: The New Oxford Book of English Verse, 1250-1950 (Oxford Books of Verse) by Helen Gardner (Oct 26, 1972)

    Both the complete “Megaset” and the Oxford Poetry reference book may be obtained by contacting http://WWW.Amazon.Com

    David (Tex) Allen,
    Columbia PA USA
    DavidAllenUSA@Yahoo.Com
    September 18, 2013

  18. Andrew Says:

    Good tip Tex. Let me just remind British viewers that they need to check their DVD players can play Region 1 DVDs. European DVD players often only play Region 2. Just went on amazon.com and I see it would cost about £10 less than on amazon.co.uk including shipping.

  19. David "Tex" Allen Says:

    My Sept. 19, 2013 post is headlined “David ‘Tex’ Allen says: ‘Your comment is awaiting moderation.”

    I didn’t write this headline, but did want to thank Andrew for his kind words about my tip re: the RUMPOLE “Megaset” and Oxford Poetry Book for sales to RUMPOLE Poetry Quote enthusiasts.

    “Thank You, Andrew!”
    Probably there is some kind of glitch in the program and the “awaiting moderation” headline remained after my DVD ALL REGION PLAYER writing was posted.

    Well, nobody’s perfect, and neither are blog website tech setups.

    BTW, this is a great blog and thank you to http://WWW.WordPress.Com for making a site like this possible.

    Thank you, yet again.

    David “Tex” Allen,
    Columbia (Lancaster County) PA USA
    Email: DavidAllenUSA@Yahoo.Com
    September 21, 2013

  20. David "Tex" Allen Says:

    Horace Rumpole and the Poems Quoted (Re-spaced for easier reading, hopefully, with my apologies to the originator of the quote list…who did a great job!….Thanks from David Allen 9/25/13)
    ———————-
    Horace Rumpole and the Poems (and Classics) Quoted
    ——————
    What follows is a repeat presentation of many of the quotes from the RUMPOLE OF THE BAILEY (BBC 1975 – 1992) TV series…the main character quotes classic poetry and also fragments from Shakespeare in the course of each of the 44 episodes presented. These quotes were listed and presented as part of an internet blog titled “Ratnumber6’s Blog” located at the following Internet URL address: http://ratnumber6.wordpress.com

    I visited this address for the first time in 2013, made several brief posts, and decided to try to re-type the list of RUMPOLE QUOTES provided at the start of the blog with more spacing to make the list easier to read.

    I also added a quote provided for RUMPOLE by a college level Latin teacher from Horace, the ancient Roman poet, which RUMPOLE translates and repeats in the RIGHT TO SILENCE episode…..see below. Strictly speaking, the quote is not one which RUMPOLE originates (true of all other quotes on the blog list), but it is interesting and educational and seemed to take RUMPOLE’s fancy at the very end of the RIGHT TO SILENCE episode (also the ancient poet and RUMPOLE share the same first name…”Horace”).

    I hope posting this list is helpful and makes the already considerable work done by the person who manages this blog easier to understand due to easier to read spacing.

    I screen the entire RUMPOLE “Megaset” DVD collection of 44 episodes every year and enjoy the quotes part of this blog. In time, I hope to identify and perhaps post the entire text of poems quoted (usually only fragments are quoted, almost never the entire poem).

    Thank you from:
    David “Tex” Allen,
    Columbia (Lancaster County), Pennsylvania USA 17512
    Email: DavidAllenUSA@Yahoo.Com
    September 25, 2013
    ——————-

    FROM THE ORIGINAL BLOG QUOTE LIST, BUT RE-SPACED:

    Rumpole of the Bailey, about Rumpole the idiosyncratic barrister practicing in London, by John Mortimer is one of my favorite TV series of all times.

    Among the many reasons to like this TV-series, poetry for me is a top attraction.

    Rumpole recites passages from classic poems and plays almost in every episode.

    What is so endearing about his quoting poetry and the classics is his choice of poems and passages there from is always a perfect fit for the plot of the episode.

    Through watching this TV series, one gets the delightful education of some beautiful gems of English literature without the burden of having to sit through a test at the end.

    Now that is edutainment.

    Here is a partial list of the poems and other works cited.

    It will be updated as and when I discover more gems while I continue to watch and re-watch Rumpole.

    Help and comments from all fellow Rumpole fans are most welcome.

    Sorry for the lack of the table format which was lost while pasting over from MS-WORD.

    Updated 29 August 2012
    ————————————–

    Each of the following citations includes:

    RUMPOLE OF THE BAILEY Series Number
    (There were 3 groups of RUMPOLE dramas, each group called a “series”)
    Episode Title
    Poet
    Poem Title
    Catch Lines (i.e. Fragment of the poem Rumpole quotes)
    ————————
    FIRST SERIES (OF 3 PART OF “RUMPOLE MEGASET”)…..Note the entire series has 44 episodes….the “Megaset DVD Collection” offers all 44 episodes divided into 3 groups…the program was originally divided into 7 “series” which includes the same 44 episodes.
    —————

    1.0
    Confession Of Guilt
    ———-
    William Wordsworth
    There Was A Boy

    At evening, when the earliest stars began
    To move along the edges of the hills
    —————————-

    1.1
    The Younger Generation
    —————-
    William Wordsworth
    Intimations Of Immortality From Recollections Of Early Childhood

    But trailing clouds of glory do we come

    ————————

    1.2
    Alternative Society
    —————–
    William Wordsworth
    It Is Not To Be Thought Of

    We must be free or die, who speak the tongue
    That Shakspeare spake; the faith and morals hold
    Which Milton held
    ————————-

    1.2 Alternative Society
    —————————

    William Wordsworth
    It Is A Beauteous Evening, Calm And Free

    It is a beauteous evening, calm and free,
    The holy time is quiet as a Nun
    Breathless with adoration; the broad sun
    Is sinking down in its tranquillity;
    The gentleness of heaven broods o’er the Sea:.
    ————————

    1.3
    The Honourable Member
    ——————–

    William Shakespeare
    A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act 3, Scene 1

    And when she weeps, weeps every little flower,
    Lamenting some enforced chastity

    ——————————-

    1.4
    The Married Lady
    ———————–

    William Shakespeare
    King Richard II, Act 5, scene 5

    I wasted time, and now doth time waste me
    ——————————

    1.5
    The Married Lady
    ——————
    Percy Bysshe Shelley
    Epipsychidion

    With one chained friend, perhaps a jealous foe,
    The dreariest and the longest journey go
    ————————–

    1.5
    The Married Lady
    ——————-

    Scott, Sir Walter
    Marmion

    Uncertain, coy, and hard to please,
    And variable as the shade
    By the light quivering aspen made
    ———————-

    1.6
    Heavy Brigade
    ——————–
    Thomas Hood
    November

    No warmth, no cheerfulness
    ————————–

    1.6
    Heavy Brigade
    ———————

    William Wordsworth

    My heart leaps up when I behold a rainbow in the sky
    —————————

    1.6
    Heavy Brigade
    ————————

    John Keats
    Ode to Autumn

    Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
    Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
    ———————-
    SECOND SERIES (OF 3 PART OF “RUMPOLE MEGASET”)
    ———————–

    2.1
    Man of God
    ——————-
    Robert Browning
    Song,
    From Pippa Passes

    Morning’s at seven;
    The hill-side’s dew-pearled

    ————————-
    2.1
    Man of God
    ——————-

    William Wordsworth
    The Solitary Reaper

    Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
    For old, unhappy, far-off things
    And battles long ago:
    —————————–

    2.2
    The Case of Identity
    ——————-

    William Blake
    The Tiger

    Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
    In the forests of the night,
    What immortal hand or eye
    Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
    ————————-

    2.2
    The Case of Identity
    ——————-

    William Shakespeare
    Henry V Act 4 Scene 3

    That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
    Let him depart; his passport shall be made
    And crowns for convoy put into his purse:
    We would not die in that man’s company
    ——————————–

    2.3
    The Show Folks
    ——————-

    William Shakespeare
    Hamlet Act 1 Scene 1

    ’Tis bitter cold, and I am sick at heart
    —————————————-

    2.3
    The Show Folks
    ————————

    William Shakespeare
    Henry V Chorus 11

    Can this cockpit hold
    The vasty fields of France? or may we cram
    Within this wooden O the very casques
    That did affright the air at Agincourt?
    ——————-

    2.4
    The Fascist Beast
    ——————–

    Oliver Goldsmith
    The Village Schoolmaster

    And still they gaz’d and still the wonder grew,
    That one small head could carry all he knew.
    —————————————

    2.5
    The course of true love
    ———————-

    William Shakespeare
    A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act 1 Scene 1

    The course of true love never did run smooth
    ————————————————-

    2.6
    Age Of Retirement
    ————–

    Alfred, Lord Tennyson
    Ulysses

    It little profits that an idle king..
    How dull it is to pause, to make an end,
    To rust unburnish’d, not to shine in use!
    ———————————–

    2.6
    Age Of Retirement
    ——————–

    Alfred, Lord Tennyson
    Ulysses ..

    Matched with an agèd wife,
    I mete and dole
    Unequal laws unto a savage race,
    That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
    ..
    ‘Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
    ..
    Though much is taken, much abides; and though
    We are not now that strength which in old days
    Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are;
    One equal temper of heroic hearts,
    Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
    To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
    ———————————–

    2.7
    Rumpole’s Return
    —————

    Ben Johnson
    A Farewell to the World

    Nor for my peace will I go far,
    As wanderers do, that still do roam;
    But make my strengths, such as they are,
    Here in my bosom, and at home.

    2.7
    Rumpole’s Return
    ———————
    Shakespeare
    Sonnet 129

    The expense of spirit in a waste of shame
    Is lust in action: and till action, lust
    Is perjured, murderous, bloody, full of blame,
    Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust;

    Enjoyed no sooner but despised straight;
    Past reason hunted; and no sooner had,
    Past reason hated, as a swallowed bait,
    On purpose laid to make the taker mad.
    ——————————–

    2.7
    Rumpole’s Return
    ——————–

    Wordsworth
    British Freedom

    The flood of British freedom, which,
    To the open sea of the world’s praise,
    From dark antiquity hath flowed,
    ‘With pomp of waters, unwithstood,’
    ——————————-
    (3rd Megaset Series below includes “Series #3 through #7″….all episodes below are part of the 3rd Megaset Series)
    ——————–

    3.1
    The Genuine Article
    —————-

    John Keats
    Ode On Grecian Urn

    ‘Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all
    Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know

    —————-

    3.2
    The Golden Thread
    ————————-

    James Elroy Flecker
    The Golden Road (Journey) to Samarkand

    Away, for we are ready to a man!
    Our camels sniff the evening and are glad.
    Lead on, O Master of the Caravan:
    Lead on the Merchant-Princes of Bagdad.

    We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
    Always a little further: it may be
    Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
    Across that angry or that glimmering sea…
    ———————-

    3.3
    The Old Boy Net
    ———————–

    Robert Louis Stevenson
    Requiem

    Under the wide and starry sky
    Dig the grave and let me lie:
    Glad did I live and gladly die,
    And I laid me down with a will.

    This be the verse you ‘grave for me:
    Here he lies where he long’d to be;
    Home is the sailor, home from the sea,
    And the hunter home from the hill.
    ———————————

    3.4
    The Female of the Species
    ——————-

    Shakespeare
    Julius Caesar Act III,

    There is a tide in the affairs of men,
    Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
    Omitted, all the voyage of their life
    Is bound in shallows and in miseries.

    On such a full sea are we now afloat;
    And we must take the current when it serves,
    Or lose our ventures.
    ———————————-

    3.5
    The Sporting Life
    ———————–

    William Blake
    Auguries Of Innocence

    A robin redbreast [calling pheasant] in a cage
    Puts all heaven in a rage
    ————————–

    3.6
    The Last Resort
    ————————–
    Shakespeare
    Sonnet 66

    Tired with all these, for restful death, I cry.
    ———————————

    4.1
    The Old Old Story
    ——————–
    Wordsworth
    It Is Not To Be Thought Of

    In our halls is hung
    Armoury of the invincible Knights of old:
    We must be free or die, who speak the tongue
    That Shakspeare spake;

    the faith and morals hold
    Which Milton held.–
    In everything we are sprung
    Of Earth’s first blood,
    have titles manifold.
    ——————————-
    4.2
    The Blind Tasting
    ——————–
    John Keats
    Ode To A Nightingale

    With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, And purple-stained mouth; That I might drink, and leave the world unseen, And with thee fade away into the forest dim
    ———————

    4.3
    The Official Secret
    ———–
    William Congreve
    The Double Dealer (1694)

    Retired to their tea and scandal, according to their ancient custom.
    ——————-

    4.4
    The Judge’s Elbow
    ————
    Rudyard Kipling
    The Song of the Little Hunter

    Through the Jungle very softly flits a shadow and a sigh

    ———————

    4.5
    The Bright Seraphim
    —————-
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge
    Rime Of The Ancient Mariner

    This seraph-band, each waved his hand :
    It was a heavenly sight !
    —————————-

    4.6
    Last Case
    ————
    Alfred, Lord Tennyson
    The Lotus Eater

    “Couraage!” he said, and pointed toward the land, “This mounting wave will roll us shoreward soon.”
    In the afternoon they came unto a land
    In which it seemed always afternoon.
    ——————————–

    4.6
    Last Case
    ———-
    Arthur Hugh Clough
    How Pleasant It Is To Have Money

    As I sat at the cafe, I said to myself
    —————–

    4.6
    Last Case
    —————
    James Graham
    My Dear And Only Love

    He either fears his fate too much,
    Or his deserts are small,
    That puts it not unto the touch
    To win or lose it all
    —————————

    5.1
    The Bubbling Reputation
    ——————-

    John Keats
    La Belle Dame..

    What can ail thee..
    ———————————

    5.1
    The Bubble Reputation
    —————-

    Shakespeare
    Othello, Act III Scene 3

    Who steals my purse steals trash; ’tis something, nothing;
    ’Twas mine, ’t is his, and has been slave to thousands;
    But he that filches from me my good name
    Robs me of that which not enriches him
    And makes me poor indeed.
    ———————–

    5.1
    The Bubble Reputation
    —————

    Wordsworth
    And homeless near a thousand homes I stood

    And homeless near a thousand homes I stood,
    And near a thousand tables pined and wanted food
    ——————–

    5.2
    The Barrow Boy
    ——————-

    William Shakespeare
    Macbeth, Act 2 scene 2

    Methought I heard a voice cry,
    ‘Sleep no more!
    Macbeth doth murder sleep’
    —————-

    5.3
    The Age Of Miracles
    ————–

    William Shakespeare
    Richard III, Act 3, Scene 7

    When holy and devout religious men
    Are at their beads,
    ’tis hard to draw them thence,
    So sweet is zealous contemplation
    ————-

    5.4
    The Tap End
    ————-

    O. Goldsmith
    When Lovely Woman Stoops To Folly

    When lovely woman stoops to folly,
    And finds too late that men betray,
    ————————–

    5.5
    Portia

    Percy Bysshe Shelley

    To A Skylark

    We look before and after,
    And pine for what is not
    ————–

    5.6
    The Quality Of Life

    Alfred, Lord Tennyson
    The Charge Of The Light Brigade

    Cannon to right of them cannon to left of them
    ———————

    6.1
    A La Carte William
    —————–

    Wordsworth
    The River Duddon

    Sole listener, Duddon! to the breeze that played
    With thy clear voice, I caught the fitful sound
    Wafted o’er sullen moss and craggy mound
    ————————

    6.1
    A La Carte
    —————-

    William Wordsworth
    Daffodils

    For oft, when on my couch I lie
    In vacant or in pensive mood
    ———————-

    6.2
    Summer of Discontent
    ————–

    Robert Browning
    Pippa’s Song

    The year’s at the spring,
    And day’s at the morn;
    Morning’s at seven;
    The hill-side’s dew-pearl’d;

    The lark’s on the wing;
    The snail’s on the thorn;
    God’s in His heaven –
    All’s right with the world!
    ——————–

    6.2
    Summer of Discontent
    ——————-

    Algernon Charles Swinburne
    The Garden of Proserpine

    From too much love of living,
    From hope and fear set free,
    We thank with brief thanksgiving
    Whatever gods may be

    That no life lives for ever;
    That dead men rise up never;
    That even the weariest river
    Winds somewhere safe to sea.
    ——————

    6.3
    The Right to Silence
    ——————-

    William Wordsworth
    Ode/Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood

    But yet I know, where’er I go,
    That there hath passed away
    A glory from the earth
    ——————

    Horace (65 BC – 8 BC)
    “Atque inter silvus Academi quaerere verum.”
    (Translation: “Seek for truth in the groves of Academe.”)
    —————————

    6.4
    Rumpole at Sea
    ————————–

    Samuel Taylor Cooleridge
    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

    Like one that on a lonesome road
    Doth walk in fear and dread,
    And having once turned round walks on,
    And turns no more his head;

    Because he knows, a frightful fiend
    Doth close behind him tread.

    But soon there breathed a wind on me,
    Nor sound nor motion made:
    Its path was not upon the sea,
    In ripple or in shade.
    It raised my hair, it fanned my cheek
    Like a meadow-gale of spring–

    It mingled strangely with my fears,
    Yet it felt like a welcoming.
    Swiftly, swiftly flew the ship,
    Yet she sailed softly too:

    Sweetly, sweetly blew the breeze–
    On me alone it blew.
    —————–

    6.4
    Rumpole at Sea
    ———————-

    Lewis Carroll
    The Hunting of the Snark

    In the midst of the word he was trying to say,
    In the midst of his laughter and glee,
    He had softly and suddenly vanished away
    —————————

    6.5
    Rumpole and the Quacks
    ————————–

    Shakespeare
    Othello Act 3, Scene 3

    Not poppy, nor mandragora,
    Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world,
    Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep
    Which thou owedst yesterday.
    —————————–

    6.6
    Rumpole for the Prosecution
    —————–

    Shakespeare
    Othello Act 2, Scene 2

    Use every man after his desert,
    And who should ’scape whipping?
    ———————

    7.1
    The Children Of The Devil
    —————-

    John Milton
    Paradise Lost Book II

    High on a throne of royal state,
    which far Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind,
    Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand
    Show’rs on her kings barbaric pearl and gold,
    Satan exalted sat
    —————————–

    7.2 Miscarriage of Justice – – –
    ———————

    7.3
    The Eternal Triangle
    ——————————

    Shakespeare
    Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1

    Nymph in thy orisons be all my sins remembered
    ———————————

    7.3
    The Eternal Triangle
    ——————————

    John Keats
    La Belle Dame Sans Merci

    I met a lady in the meads
    Full beautiful, a faery’s child;
    Her hair was long,
    her foot was light,
    And her eyes were wild
    ———————————–

    7.4
    The Reform of Joby Johnson
    ————————–

    Shakespeare
    Tempest Act 3 Scene 2

    Be not afeard.
    The isle is full of noises,
    Sounds, and sweet airs
    that give delight and hurt not.

    Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
    Will hum about mine ears,
    and sometime voices
    That, if I then had waked after long sleep,
    Will make me sleep again.

    And then, in dreaming,
    The clouds methought would open and show riches
    Ready to drop upon me,
    that when I waked
    I cried to dream again.
    ———————————–

    7.5
    The Family Pride

    Alfred, Lord Tennyson
    Blow Bugle Blow

    The splendour falls on castle walls
    And snowy summits old in story
    —————————

    7.5
    The Family Pride

    Robert Southey
    Inchcape Rock

    No stir in the air,
    no stir in the sea
    ————————–

    7.6
    On Trial

    Lord Byron
    We’ll Go No More A-roving

    For the sword outwears its sheath,
    And the soul wears out the breast,
    And the heart must pause to breathe,
    And love itself have rest.
    ————————–

  21. Paul L. Meihaus, Sr. Says:

    I am extremely pleased to find other dedicated Rumpole fans.
    I have recently been re-viewing the numerous Rumpole episodes with great delight….thank-you to those of you who have compiled the many poetry quotations from the various programs.

    Leo McKern’s dramatic portrayal of Rumpole provided me an experience of English poetry especially of William Wordsworth, who Rumpole has said in some of the episodes “needs admirers”.

    I have read, studied, and memorized many of Wordsworth’s poems and many of the others that Leo recited so dramatically. It has been a blessing to have had the experience of the great acting portrayals of not only Rumpole but so many of the other characters in the programs.

    Looking forward to further discussion about the legacy of Rumpole,

    Sincerely,

    Paul, from California

    P.S.: A number of years ago, I wrote Leo McKern and he returned a letter to me, and I am hoping I still have the letter somewhere in my personal belongings. He was very generous to take the time to write me and was blessed to have had the opportunity to communicate with him.

  22. David "Tex" Allen Says:

    Rumpole was correct about Wordsworth!

    I think that William Wordsworth (1770 – 1850) is the best 19th century English poet of all and that pre-1850 poets like Colleridge and Scott and Blake were near to Wordsworth’s greatness.

    The wonderful, booming voice of Leo McKern reciting fragments of this great poetry makes all the difference.

    Hearing the poetry recited is important, and when poetry recitation is well done, that is the best of all.

    The late Ian Richardson (1934 – 2007) was an English stage actor of fame (he played MARAT in MARAT/SADE, and also Francis Urqhart in HOUSE OF CARDS BBC TV series) who also had a wonderful voice for trumpeting out wonderfully composed words of poetry and drama imperiously, in a manner similar to the high quality of Leo McKern.

    Both my late parents recited long poems to me when I was very young, and my lifelong love of good English language poetry is one of the best legacies I got from my family, I’m glad to say.

    American 19th century poetry by Longfellow and Poe are very good, and so is laler 19th century poetry by Tennyson, Noyes, Kipling, Service and A.E. Houseman. Good recordings of the “best of the best poetry” are hard to get, but it is possible to “do it yourself.”

    Record the best poems of all, play it back on home machines often. Great company, great culture!

    I’ve done this and got very good results.

    David Allen
    Columbia (LancaserCounty), Pennsylvania USA
    October 2, 2013
    Email: DavidAllenUSA@Yahoo.Com

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